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Decode Your Meralco Bill: Understanding Your Utility Consumption

It’s a bit complicated to look at, yes, but closer examination will reveal what it’s telling you, and can teach you a bit about your own electricity consumption and where you can save up.

Below are the different parts of your bill and explanations for each.

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Parts Of The Bill

  1. Account Name and Billing Address - Refers to the account holder and the address to which the bill is delivered.
  2. Customer Service Lines - Give you their 24-hour call center number and their website address.
  3. Branch/Collecting Office - The address and contact number of the nearest branch/collecting office assigned to you.
  4. Your Service Information
    • Service ID Number (SIN): Like a bank account number, the SIN is a unique user tracking number assigned to you. Having this handy facilitates faster and more efficient service when making payments or inquiries.
    • Your Rate Classification: Identifies the corresponding rate based on type of service (Residential, General Service, Government Hospital/Metered Streetlight, Industrial, Non-Industrial or Flat Streetlight).
    • Contract Name, Service Address: You and your billing address.
  5. Your Billing Information
    • Bill Date: The date your bill was generated.
    • Billing Period: Start and end date of consumption being billed.
    • Due Date: When you should settle your bill to avoid notice of disconnection.
    • Total kWh: Amount of electricity consumed during the billing period.
    • Total Current Amount: Amount due for the current billing period.
  6. Billing Summary - A table summarizing all applicable charges for the current billing period. (Breakdown of each charge at the back of the bill.)
  7. Announcements - Space used for tips, news, promos, rebates, and other significant updates regarding savings or changes in electricity rates.
  8. Your Consumption History - A bar graph showing your electricity consumption for the current month and each of the last 12 months. Also indicates average usage per month in kilowatt hours and per day in pesos for the past year.
  9. Bill Stub - Section of the bill showing pertinent payment-related information, that is torn off by authorized collecting agents upon receiving your payment.
  10. Your metering Information - The corresponding readings of your enrolled meter/s. Your kilowatt hour (kWh) consumption is the result of subtracting the Previous reading from the Present reading, and multiplying it by your service-type rate.
  11. Details of Your Charges - Itemized breakdown of how much you’re being billed for each charge. (See “Breakdown of Your Charges.”) (a) and (b) Additional Information - Related information like price changes, applicable refund balances, etc.
  12. Contact Information - Meralco’s call center and assigned branch phone numbers and website; the Energy Regulatory Commission’s customer hotlines, email address, and website.
  13. Payment Instructions - Handy payment-related tips. For every peso paid, approximately 13 centavos goes to Meralco, 87 centavos to power suppliers and government. Meralco collects for them and remits to them each time you pay so you only have one payment to make every month.

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Breakdown Of Your Charges

  1. Generation—This goes to the power suppliers (e.g. NaPoCor, independent power producers).
  2. Transmission—This goes to the transmission company responsible for transmitting the electricity that the power suppliers produce (e.g. TransCo).
  3. System Loss—Recovery cost of power loss due to system losses both technical (e.g. equipment failure, system breakdowns) and non-technical (e.g. pilferage from illegal power line tapping).
  4. Distribution—Cost of building, operating, and maintaining the distribution system (e.g. power lines, metering facilities); customer service (billing, collection, manpower); and peso-dollar rate fluctuations.
  5. Subsidies—Marginalized customers who consume no more than 100 kWh get socialized pricing. The discount they get is subsidized by you!
  6. Goverment Taxes and Universal Charges—Used to fund the electrification of remote areas not connected to the transmission system.
  7. Other Charges—Backbillings, applicable refunds, prepayments, etc.

Photos from www.meralco.com.ph

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