• Baked Fossilized Fish

    Dress up leftover food in quirky assemblies using easy-to-find ingredients and everyday kitchen materials.

  • fossil3_CI.jpg  

    Fossilized Fish
    Do some archeological digging with this multilayered baked dish. It is a complete meal in itself, providing your family their carbohydrate, protein, and calcium needs. Here’s a tip: you don’t even have to waste your energy boiling, peeling, and squashing to make mashed potatoes—just buy them from an inexpensive fast-food restaurant near your house.

     

    What you need:
    1 cup leftover steamed fish, flaked
    4 cups mashed potatoes
    1 cup mushrooms, sliced
    1 can whole, peeled tomatoes
    1/2 small onion, chopped
    1 tbsp. garlic, chopped
    Olive oil
    Salt and pepper
    Food coloring, red and yellow
    6” springform pan (used for baking cheesecakes)
    Pastry brush

     

    Steps:
    1.In a sauce pan, sauté onions, garlic, mushrooms, and leftover fish in olive oil.

    2.Add a can of whole, peeled tomatoes, including the sauce. Cut up tomatoes with your ladle while stirring. Stir sauce until thick. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    Note: sauce has to be thick so the dish will stay firm and won’t become runny. If the sauce is still thin, add tomato paste.

    3.Spread half of the mashed potatoes, or an inch-thick layer of it, on a six-inch springform pan. You may also use a casserole dish, but use a clear one so layers
    are visible.

    4.Pour sauce on top of mashed potatoes and cover with second layer of mashed potatoes.

    5.Use a toothpick to outline a fish-bone figure on the mashed potatoes. With a pastry brush, dab red food coloring on the fish bone etching, then yellow food coloring around it to create a fossilized effect.

    6.Bake at 120°C for 15 minutes.

    7.Cool for a bit before removing from the springform pan.

    8.Serves four to six persons.

     

    Photography by Nelson Rivera

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