• Kids Who Do Chores Are More Likely to Succeed As Adults, Says Study

    Chores taught children the importance of contributing to their families which leads them to become empathetic adults
  • A child raking leaves

    Photo Source: Lotus Carroll/Flickr

    Parents know that chores can be good for their children. Chores teach children everyday life skills, and it’s always good for moms and dads get a little help around the house.

    Aside from this, a recent study shows that chores can benefit your child in the long run too. Children who do chores grow up to be well-adjusted adults who have good relationships with their friends and family.

    The study from the University of Mississippi analyzed data collected from over 25 years, starting in 1967, to find out if there was a relation between helping out with household chores at age 3 to 4 and success in life by the time the person reached their mid-20s.

    Researcher Marty Rossman found that children who helped around the house were more likely to grow up to be well-adjusted adults with successful careers and better relationships with their friends and family compared to the children who didn’t do any chores.

    Rossman said that doing chores taught the children the importance of contributing to their families, which in turn, led them to be more empathetic adults, according to The Washington Times.

    In a 2012 interview with Smart Parenting, mom Coco Castro Cruz, a nation-builder, social entrepreneur and a hands-on parent of two children, also agreed that chores shape kids into becoming better adults.

    “Eventually, when kids grow into adults, they will need to run their own families and their own homes,” she said. “More than the obvious domestic benefits, exposing them early into a culture of helping others makes children grow up to be responsible, caring adults,” she added.

    For kids aged 3 to 4, Smart Parenting contributor and child development resource person Rowena Matti suggests these simple chores:

    • Help wipe up mess
    • Pack away toys and books
    • Take laundry to the laundry room
    • Clear and set the table
    • Dust the room
    • Help out in cooking and preparing food
    • Carry and put away groceries
    • Line up shoes by pair or place them back on the shoe rack



    Sources:

    July 15, 2015. "It's not just about getting your kids to do chores — it's teaching them how". deseretnews.com
    July 12, 2015. "Study finds having kids do chores is a good thing". washingtontimes.com

    Inside Out


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