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    “Did you know that goal-setting is one of the most highly correlated traits of peak performers and successful individuals?” This is the question parenting expert and bestselling author Dr. Michele Borba poses to parents in an article titled, “Helping Kids Become Goal-Setters.”

    Dr. Borba goes on to state the importance of goal-setting for kids, writing, “Studies show that goal-setting can help kids gain the sense of discipline and that internal drive it takes to stay motivated to complete the tasks they’ve set for themselves.”

    Thus, it is important for parents to teach their children to set goals.

    Setting school goals
    Setting goals for school, in particular, is crucial, according to licensed independent clinical social worker and therapist Stephanie Donaldson-Pressman, who is also the clinical director of New England Center for Pediatric Psychology.

    Donaldson-Pressman writes on the Psychology Today website, “If children are going to become academically successful, they need to feel ownership of their education.” Goal-setting will help them achieve this sense of “ownership.”

    Locally, registered family psychologist and Miriam College lecturer Michele S. Alignay also emphasizes the importance of setting goals, especially for grade school kids.

    “Goal-setting helps children be aware of their strengths and weaknesses, and areas they should focus on,” she explains. “It also makes kids have a sense of responsibility towards [their] studies.”

    “While school should be fun,” Alignay continues, “the importance of hard work, diligence, and self-reliance are the underlying values behind setting such goals.”

    The parent’s motivation in setting goals
    Jennylyn Diesto, a freelance party host/organizer, usually helps her kids Mikay and Sammy, both aged 7, set goals before going back to school.

    “I want to train my kids to be well-prepared before they go back to school,” she shares. “I believe they should understand the value of education, and to start loving it as early as possible to prevent them from experiencing future difficulties.”

    Academic goal-setting is also important to Manette Aquino, a freelance writer and blogger, and mom to Romnuel, 11, Reighmann, 9, and Reianne, 8.

    “I want my kids to realize that they cannot get anywhere in life if they don’t have goals — so, they should learn how to set goals even at an early age,” she explains.


    How to help your child set academic goals
    If, like Manette and Jennylyn, you want to help your kids set school goals, Alignay suggests the following steps:

    1. Get to know your child.
    “You must know your child well to help him/her set goals,” Alignay explains. Encourage your child to be open to you at all times — this will help you get to know him or her better.

    “Be realistic in knowing their strengths, weaknesses, interests, mental ability and maturity,” Alignay adds.


    2. Discover your child’s learning style.
    “Know their learning style and use it as a benchmark,” Alignay says. “That way, you will know when and how to motivate your children, and assist them in achieving their goals.”

    Alignay cites her own son Migo as an example.

    “He likes to play outdoors, and he does well in Math and other academic subjects. His goal is to be an honor student,” she shares.

    “Even if he excels in his subjects, we have established the ‘rule’ that he needs to complete his schoolwork before engaging in any active play,” she continues. “Thus, his active play is the incentive for him to do well in school.

    ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

    3. Choose the goals wisely.
    Alignay advises parents to be prudent in helping their kids set academic goals.

    “Set simple goals — one pace or quarter at a time,” she explains. “If your child is having difficulty in one area, start working on that area and acknowledge his strengths in other areas.”

    4. Set SMART goals.
    Alignay emphasizes the importance of setting SMART goals. “They should be Simple, Measurable, Appropriate to the child’s level, Realistic, and Time-bound,” she says.

    Setting SMART goals will help keep you and your child stay focused without setting yourselves up for disappointment if your goals are not met.

    5. Give “intangible” rewards for achieving goals.
    “Do not use gifts and materials as rewards,” Alignay warns. “Kids are supposed to study — not get a toy or a money for getting high grades.”

    She further states that while some parents may give such “tangible rewards” when their children achieve something, they “should not be demanded and articulated.”

    Instead, parents are encouraged to come up with more creative ways to “reward” their kids, by keeping the phrase “Experiences over things” as a guide.


    To end, remember that goal-setting is something that should bring you and your child closer, and not something that will bring tension and stress. Focus on the fact that your child can and will achieve great things, with the proper guidance, encouragement, and support.


    References:
    http://micheleborba.com/blog/michele-borba-blog-teaching-kids-to-set-new-years-resolutions-that-stick/

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/school-thought/201408/three-steps-helping-children-set-academic-goals-1

    5 Ways to Help Your Child Set School Goals

     

    It’s never too early to teach your child to set goals, especially when it comes to school. Here are a few pointers to get you started.

     

    By Tina Santiago Rodriguez

     

    “Did you know that goal-setting is one of the most highly correlated traits of peak performers and successful individuals?” This is the question parenting expert and bestselling author Dr. Michele Borba poses to parents in an article titled, “Helping Kids Become Goal-Setters.”

     

    Dr. Borba goes on to state the importance of goal-setting for kids, writing, “Studies show that goal-setting can help kids gain the sense of discipline and that internal drive it takes to stay motivated to complete the tasks they’ve set for themselves.”

     

    Thus, it is important for parents to teach their children to set goals.

     

    Setting school goals

    Setting goals for school, in particular, is crucial, according to licensed independent clinical social worker and therapist Stephanie Donaldson-Pressman, who is also the clinical director of New England Center for Pediatric Psychology.

    ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

     

    Donaldson-Pressman writes on the Psychology Today website, “If children are going to become academically successful, they need to feel ownership of their education.” Goal-setting will help them achieve this sense of “ownership.”

     

    Locally, registered family psychologist and Miriam College lecturer Michele S. Alignay also emphasizes the importance of setting goals, especially for grade school kids.

     

    “Goal-setting helps children be aware of their strengths and weaknesses, and areas they should focus on,” she explains. “It also makes kids have a sense of responsibility towards [their] studies.”

     

    “While school should be fun,” Alignay continues, “the importance of hard work, diligence, and self-reliance are the underlying values behind setting such goals.”

     

    The parent’s motivation in setting goals

    Jennylyn Diesto, a freelance party host/organizer, usually helps her kids Mikay and Sammy, both aged 7, set goals before going back to school.

     

    “I want to train my kids to be well-prepared before they go back to school,” she shares. “I believe they should understand the value of education, and to start loving it as early as possible to prevent them from experiencing future difficulties.”

    Academic goal-setting is also important to Manette Aquino, a freelance writer and blogger, and mom to Romnuel, 11, Reighmann, 9, and Reianne, 8.

     

    “I want my kids to realize that they cannot get anywhere in life if they don’t have goals — so, they should learn how to set goals even at an early age,” she explains.

     

     

    How to help your child set academic goals

    If, like Manette and Jennylyn, you want to help your kids set school goals, Alignay suggests the following steps:

     

    1. Get to know your child.

    “You must know your child well to help him/her set goals,” Alignay explains. Encourage your child to be open to you at all times — this will help you get to know him or her better.

     

    “Be realistic in knowing their strengths, weaknesses, interests, mental ability and maturity,” Alignay adds.

     

     

    2. Discover your child’s learning style.

    “Know their learning style and use it as a benchmark,” Alignay says. “That way, you will know when and how to motivate your children, and assist them in achieving their goals.”

     

    Alignay cites her own son Migo as an example.

     

    “He likes to play outdoors, and he does well in Math and other academic subjects. His goal is to be an honor student,” she shares.

     

    “Even if he excels in his subjects, we have established the ‘rule’ that he needs to complete his schoolwork before engaging in any active play,” she continues. “Thus, his active play is the incentive for him to do well in school.

    ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

     

    3. Choose the goals wisely.

    Alignay advises parents to be prudent in helping their kids set academic goals.

     

    “Set simple goals — one pace or quarter at a time,” she explains. “If your child is having difficulty in one area, start working on that area and acknowledge his strengths in other areas.”

     

    4. Set SMART goals.

    Alignay emphasizes the importance of setting SMART goals. “They should be Simple, Measurable, Appropriate to the child’s level, Realistic, and Time-bound,” she says.

     

    Setting SMART goals will help keep you and your child stay focused without setting yourselves up for disappointment if your goals are not met.

     

    5. Give “intangible” rewards for achieving goals.

    “Do not use gifts and materials as rewards,” Alignay warns. “Kids are supposed to study — not get a toy or a money for getting high grades.”

     

    She further states that while some parents may give such “tangible rewards” when their children achieve something, they “should not be demanded and articulated.”

     

    Instead, parents are encouraged to come up with more creative ways to “reward” their kids, by keeping the phrase “Experiences over things” as a guide.

     

     

    To end, remember that goal-setting is something that should bring you and your child closer, and not something that will bring tension and stress. Focus on the fact that your child can and will achieve great things, with the proper guidance, encouragement, and support.

     

     

    References:

     

    http://micheleborba.com/blog/michele-borba-blog-teaching-kids-to-set-new-years-resolutions-that-stick/

     

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/school-thought/201408/three-steps-helping-children-set-academic-goals-1

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