• 10 Tales that Prove Kids Do the Sweetest Things

    You can’t help but melt at these real-life anecdotes of childhood affection.
    by Blessie Adlaon .
  • child hugging dad tightly

    Kids do the darnedest things – and thank goodness for that! Our children’s innocent expressions of affection are like fresh, cool water to our parched, tired-out spirits. As we busy moms strive frantically to keep up with this rat race we call life, the sweetness of our children bring rejuvenating bliss.

    Ten moms share with us the sweetest things their kids did for or said to them.

    The Universe Is More than Enough
    Marge Aberasturi had one of the most catastrophic birthdays in the year of 2012. On that gloomy, rainy day, their home’s water tank burst, and it had to be welded shut under a drizzling sky. She had planned to finish her laundry, do her grocery shopping, buy shoes for her daughter, and get a simple cake in honor of the day. But by afternoon, none of these had been done, thanks to that infernal tank.

    It was enough to drive any birthday girl crazy. But not Marge.

    You see, that morning, Marge’s kids gave her birthday cards. One had a pencil drawing of... planets? “It’s the universe, Mommy,” her son Jude explained. Then he apologetically added, “It’s all we can give you.”

    “It was a really happy birthday,” Marge said.


    The Basic Needs of a Child
    Mom Donna Salgado was helping his 6-year-old son study for an upcoming exam. “I was also preparing for a big presentation due the next day, and I got annoyed when he couldn’t seem to memorize the basic needs of a child,” Donna recalled. “I asked him impatiently, ‘Is it too hard to remember the things you need? Tell me. Now! What are the things you need?”

    With teary eyes, her son answered, “You, Mama.”

    “I was dumbfounded,” Donna said. “I choked back my tears, hugged him tight, set aside my work, and focused on our review session.”


    Not Yours, But…
    When Jade Dolor’s daughter turned 14 months, she learned the concept of “yours” and “mine.”

    Not long after that, Jade said, “She went to me and grabbed my face. And then, she shouted, ‘Mine!’”


    Forgiven
    Tina Rodriguez confesses that patience is a virtue she does not always posses when homeschooling her children, especially her 7-year-old son. “I lose my temper when teaching him sometimes – okay, a lot of times,” she said. So she was truly amazed to hear that her son would still rather have her as his teacher than anybody else. His explanation brought tears to the eyes of his guilt-ridden mama: “Because I like being with you,” he simply said.


    Sweet Talker
    Kaje Salvador was driving with her daughter one day when suddenly, out of nowhere, her 4-year-old asked, “Do you know, Nanay, why I’m smiling?”

    The little girl answered her own question. “I’m smiling because I love you.” Then she continued, “And I’m also smiling because you love me too!”


    “I’ll Bring Your Friends Home”
    It had been an exceptionally fun day for Peewee Abesamis-Samonte. Her closest friends, who had all moved overseas, came home en masse, and they had a wonderful reunion.

    But of course, all good things come to an end, and as her friends left, Peewee felt sad.

    “Mommy, when I grow up, I will get all your friends and bring them back here,” Peewee’s son said.

    “You’ll end up very poor if you do that,” Peewee couldn’t help smiling at her son’s ambition.

    “That’s okay,” her son said. “I don’t mind. As long as you’re not sad anymore.”


    Dr. Pillow
    Dianne Sio Kaw was cuddling with her son Jacob after his naptime when her back began to hurt. So she tried to stand up, saying, “Wait, baby, Mommy’s back is a bit ouchie.”

    But Jacob had other ideas. He took his favorite pillow and put it behind his mom’s back. He told her, “You can lie down again now, Mommy. When your back is ouchie, you tell me to get a pillow for you, okay?”


    ‘This One’s on Me, Mom’
    It was almost Donna Donor’s birthday. She and her seven-year-old son Kib were at a boutique, looking for shirts to buy. She found one for herself and tried it on, and as she stepped out of the fitting room, she found Kib waiting, “Holding a shirt he had chosen for me,” she said.

    So of course, Donna tried it on too and bought it. “When we got home,” she recalled, “he opened his piggy bank and gave me the contents.” The seven-year-old wanted to pay for the shirt himself. It was, after all, his gift for his mom.


    Mornings that Last Forever
    Kimverley Oania’s daughter is only four months old. She’s too little to talk, but she’s already able to melt her momma’s heart with her wordless expressions of affection. “She touches my face when I greet her, ‘Good morning, baby.’ Then she makes eye contact and smiles and coos as if she’s already talking to me.”

    “I know through her actions that she appreciates me,” Kimverley said. “All the struggles I had during pregnancy and breastfeeding are worth it. Mornings like this are to be cherished forever.”


    Mama’s Rock
    Life hasn’t been easy for Jenny Velasco, and sometimes, the pressure just gets to her. “I have times when I would just cry uncontrollably, lying down, hugging the pillows, tears flowing non-stop,” she said. And although she tried to hide all this from her 5-year-old son, he would notice it anyway.

    “One time, he found me,” said Jenny. “He just lay beside me, put his face close to mine, and looked into my eyes. He said, ‘It’s okay, mom. I love you.’ Then he put his arms around me and just stayed there, waiting for me, for as long as it took, just waiting for me to calm down.”


    Truly, the best joys are the simplest ones. Our kids may not be able to give much, but they know exactly what we need: reassurance of our worth, love that fully accepts and forgives, and sincere expressions of affection that ask for nothing in return – the kind that only an innocent child can give.

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    What was the sweetest thing your child did for or said to you? Share it with us by leaving a comment below!

    Image by photosavvy from flickr creative commons

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