• The Neglected Importance of Reading + The Fast ForWord Reading Program

    Dad and contributor Rob del Rosario shares his thoughts on the neglected importance of reading, his experiences as a dyslexic, and the Fast ForWord Program for children with learning disabilities.
    by Rob Del Rosario .
  • kids readingReading among today’s youth
    Although the humble thumb has paved the way for evolutionary progress in our species, it has been relegated to the use of gaming gadgets by most of the very young. Reading, sadly, has been put aside in favor of technological recreation. It may not be as negative as one may think as this may be part of a bigger scope of progress.

    Summer is on its way, and so are our fears of our children getting holed up in electronic trenches. Aside from the typical sporting clinics and music lessons, why not try and rekindle ties with a long lost friend and open doors to the written word? There is a distinct difference between reading just to get by, and reading to comprehend.


    Firing up imagination and creative thinking
    The latter leads to more neurons firing up in the brain: imagination, creativity, healthy curiosity, and a general eagerness to delve into any field, due mostly to initial exploration done through the good old sturdy book. A child exposed to mental exploration of flora and fauna through the wonders of words will conjure up his own safari.  He or she will begin to ask many a question, and no sooner be tugging on your shirt tails for a visit to a petting zoo. A fantasy book about racing cars and heroes may prompt a child to be more technically adept with machinery. And though good reads on fairy tales may not teach your daughter how to fly, they may encourage her towards the arts.


    Memories of Dyslexia
    Reading is a gift. From a personal perspective, I grew up with Dyslexia, a learning disability characterized by the brain having a different method of processing words. Reading and writing are potential challenges, as well as memory or retention of words. I used “different” instead of “difficulty” specifically to let you know that dyslexics do not typically have low intelligence quotients. In fact, most may excel in school once proper therapy is given.

     

    Click here to read more about the Harris Method for dyslexia and the FastForWord Program.

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