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  • Hey, Moms and Dads, You Have to Fill Your Batteries First to Play Your Role as Parents

    Feeling tired and restless? You owe yourself at least one hour to rest, meditate, and be kind to yourself.
    by Cielo Anne Calzado .
Hey, Moms and Dads, You Have to Fill Your Batteries First to Play Your Role as Parents
PHOTO BY iStock
  • It can be difficult for parents to take a break and schedule precious “me-time” when there are kids who need care and attention, a house to maintain, and a job to manage. In fact, we can guess that “me-time” for most of you is reduced to an hour in front of the TV or tablet (after the kids are asleep, of course) or a trip to the supermarket. But that one hour, no matter how you spend it, is not only rewarding and relaxing, but it is crucial for your well-being.

    On Instagram, former monk and award-winning host Jay Shetty shared that we need an hour a day of self-maintenance. He says, “I get it, it’s hard. But when we do this, it makes us better. We can give more to all the other roles we play when we fill ourselves up first. We have to fill our own batteries if we want to charge others.”

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    How to practice self-care at home

    Simple things like meditating, exercising, reading your favorite book, and taking a walk can help invigorate your senses so you can keep up with a curious toddler. Practicing self-care and working toward a better version of yourself don’t have to be expensive (it doesn’t equate to booking a stay in a fancy hotel!). Recharge within your means by finding something that relaxes you like taking a long shower. Be on your way to a healthier and happier you with these reminders:

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    Discover what makes your feel relaxed

    According to The Law of Attraction, you need to “look at your daily activities and determine which ones help you feel your best.” Is it putting on makeup even if you don’t have plans of going out or organizing your closet? How about taking a warm bath?

    Write a “Gratitude List”

    What are you thankful for today? Identify at least five and write them down. In an article on Women’s Health, Nancy B. Irwin, Psy. D. says, “No matter how bad your day sucks, we all have something to be grateful for – a home, a car, vision, two legs, etc.” Listing these helps you focus on the good and avoid overthinking things that stress you out.

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    Exercise for at least 30 minutes

    Vandana R. Sheth, R.D.N. says allotting time for simple exercises or simply moving your body (walking to the park or a nearby store and doing aerobics) “is just as good for your mental health as it is your physical.” You can follow videos on Youtube or schedule a park day with your kids. Running after them is a workout on its own!

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    Eat well

    According to Psychology Today, “the food we eat has the potential to either keep us healthy or contribute to weight gain or diseases such as diabetes, but it can also keep our minds working and alert.” Eating well and choosing a balanced diet can help you feel stronger and ready to take on the day. Nuts, broccoli, and fatty fish are considered as “self-care foods.”

    Don’t be afraid to unplug

    Are you the type who refreshes Facebook and Instagram every 30 minutes? There’s nothing wrong with keeping tabs on friends, especially if some of your relatives live abroad. Allot time for social media and make sure you schedule a needed digital detox.

    Like how we do it for our kids, limit your screen time by setting a limit. Apps that track your phone and Internet use can make this easier for you. An article on Women’s Health adds, “Set a specific time before bed and unwind with a book instead of scrolling through Instagram.”

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    Stick to your self-care time

    Practicing self-care involves saying no to dinner invitations and choosing to spend time with yourself. Don’t feel guilty when you turn down invitations. Psychology Today explains, “Moments alone can help you ponder the best ways to move forward in your life and keep you grounded.” Minor adjustments in your routine and making time for yourself spell a big difference.

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