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  • Solenn And Tili Make A Case For 'Screaming Our Feelings Out' Here's Why You Should Try It Too

    Turns out screaming can help you relieve stress.
    by Angela Baylon .
Solenn And Tili Make A Case For 'Screaming Our Feelings Out' Here's Why You Should Try It Too
PHOTO BY instagram/solenn
  • "Ayoko na!"

    Yelled Solenn Heussaff and her daughter Thylane 'Tili' Bolzico in their recent video on Instagram. As cute as the video can be, we found out that there's actually reason to believe that screaming can be a potential antidote to stress. Read on to find out more.

    For Pinoy movie buffs, the video looks like an adorable remake of that scene from That Thing Called Tadhana, where Angelica Panganiban's character screamed the exact phrase, "Ayoko na," on top of a mountain.

    Facing a wide field, Solenn yelled out some phrases, and Tili would happily follow her mom's lead. The video also offers a full display of Tili's impressive language development. The 2-year-old even managed to translate the Filipino phrase into English at one point.

    The first time Solenn said "ayoko na," Tili uttered "I don't want na." Such a linguist, this little girl! (Click here to read how Solenn teaches Tili multiple languages)

    In the caption, Solenn says they are "screaming our feelings out," and it turns out it's actually beneficial to do this. It's called "scream therapy."

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    What is "scream therapy"

    "One day at a time, the primal scream made me feel like I could get through anything, global pandemic included."

    Scream therapy, or the idea of venting out negative emotions through screaming, dates back to the late 1960s when psychotherapist Arthur Janov, PhD formalized it. Janov coined this as "primal therapy" and developed it to address "mental-health issues or neuroses that presented in adulthood stemmed from repressed childhood trauma, or 'primal pain,'" as explained by a Well+Good article.

    Although this approach was met by scrutiny and questions about its efficacy, a psychotherapist from United Kingdom, Zoë Aston, recently found that "[Screaming] creates a chemical reaction that is similar to the one you get when you exercise—you get a dopamine hit and some endorphins going." Both dopamine and endorphins are considered happy hormones, which promotes positive feelings.

    Writer Aubrey Nichols also swore by the benefits of screaming. In her piece for Vogue, she wrote, "With each throaty scream, my tense lockjaw loosened. I experimented with shrieks and roars, contorting my mouth every which way to experience even deeper releases. One day at a time, the primal scream made me feel like I could get through anything, global pandemic included."

    So, just like Aubrey, parents can also find screaming helpful as they navigate through these stressful times. Although we cannot scream all the time, it's a good way to start improving our mental health — by acknowledging our negative emotions.

    Feeling stressed? Read other science-backed ways to effectively handle stress here.

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