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Iya And Drew’s Two Boys Celebrate Birthday And Daughter Alana Is In Tears—But Kuya Leon Wipes It Away
PHOTO BY INSTAGRAM /IYAVILLANIA
  • Primo and Leon Arellano just had a joint birthday celebration and it looks like their younger sister Alana may have felt left out.

    Through a series of Instagram stories caught by the boys’ guests, Alana AKA Duday was seen crying during the candle blowing and birthday song.But what “touched the hearts” of a few of Primo and Leon’s guests was what the latter did when he saw his younger sister crying—he turned to her and gently wiped her tears! What a sweet and kind kuya you are, Leon!

    Leon wipes away Alana's tears while being sung to.
    PHOTO BY INSTAGRAM /IYAVILLANIA

    Primo, the Arellano’s eldest turned 6 years old. Leon, their second-born son, turned 4 years old. Both celebrate their birthdays in August.

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    Among Primo and Leon’s guests were the children of Camille Prats and Nikki Gil.

    Some of Leon and Primo's guests.
    PHOTO BY INSTAGRAM /IYAVILLANIA

    Through Iya Villania’s Instagram stories, we see that Duday may have felt a bit left out not to be celebrating her birthday together with her kuyas. This is a familiar scene especially for parents with kids who are close to each other in age and practically do everything together.

    Alana cries while Primo and Leon wait to blow the candles of their cakes.
    PHOTO BY INSTAGRAM /IYAVILLANIA
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    Alana celebrates her birthday in July, but for young children—how do you explain that one birthday celebration per year is all we get? It’s admirable to see Iya and Drew calmly continue to celebrate their two boys’ birthday. They also did not try to manage Alana’s tears and allowed her to feel her feelings, which are very valid especially at her age.

    RELATED: How Parents Can Help Kids Deal With Negative Emotions In A Positive Way

    We’re sure that despite the tears Alana shed, she, her brothers, and their guests had much fun celebrating this milestone face to face.

    A few tips on nurturing healthy sibling relationships

    New York based resource Very Well Family says sibling relationships are important because it’s a precursor for a child’s other relationships later on in life such as in their friendships and in romance. Here are a few things to keep in mind to nurture your children’s bond with each other:

    1. Do not compare your kids.

    “Bakit hindi ka tulad ni Ate, responsable?” Or “Mas masunurin talaga si bunso sa ‘yo!” Comparing children is a “sure-fire way to stoke the fires of sibling rivalry and build resentment”. If you’re noticing sibling rivalry, try to think back to how you address your kids. Encouraging good behavior can be done without comparing siblings with each other.

    RELATED: You May Be Playing Favorites With Your Kids And Not Know It

    2. Appreciate each other’s uniqueness.

    Do you notice that your children have different personalities and interests? One might be quieter while the other one enjoys being with people more. Differences can sometimes cause conflicts and it’s never too early to teach kids how to respect and appreciate those who are different from them.

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    RELATED: Raise Siblings to Become Best Friends! 5 Tips to Manage Fights

    “The important thing is to teach kids how to respect those differences and how to keep an open eye on what’s really important: Loving each other, writes Katherine Lee for Very Well Family.

    When kids disagree about what to do, it could be an opportunity to teach them how to take turns and how to find something that interests both or all children.

    3. Build teamwork through chores.

    Teamwork and cooperation is taught in schools and workplaces through various exercises and activities and the same things can be replicated at home. Try giving kids a project to work together on or to assist each other with chores.

    Young kids love helping around the home. Try asking siblings to cleaning up their play area together or set the table for dinner together.

    You can also try racing against your own kids, parents versus kids so they work together toward a common goal.

    READ MORE STORIES ON IYA VILLANIA'S FAMILY:

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