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This 13-Year-Old Earns Five Digits A Month! Here's Her Parents' Tips On Raising A Teenage CEO
PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG
  • Most businesses started at a young age are glossed over because people assume seed money was given by parents. But in the case of Given Mendoza, a 13 year old CEO who owns and manages G’s KPop Kilig in Baguio, her parents did not fund her business.

    Instead, they supported her when she had the idea of setting up a physical store—despite their own hesitations. And since day 1, they’ve raised their daughter Given to be money smart which is why it’s no surprise that she’s already become entrepreneurial at a young age.

    Given is a Grade 8 student who turned her love for BTS and KPop into a business that is earning up to five digits a month.

    Given Mendoza is a grade 8 student who turned her love for K-pop into a business.
    PHOTO COURTESY OF JUVY SAN MIGUEL
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    Smart Parenting got a chance to talk to her parents, Juvy and Diego San Miguel, since Given was busy preparing for her exams during the time of the interview.

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    We asked the San Miguels, how do you raise a young CEO?

    Given poses with some of the baristas.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG
    K-pop merch is also for sale at G's Kpop Kilig.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG

    Money management at a young age

    Tweens and teens are usually busy mingling with friends, but Given already started a business. “She really wasn’t like other kids na sobrang naglalaro. She was focused on her studies at a young age,” Juvy said.

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    Though money management sounds complicated, Juvy shared this as their foundation with Given’s business-mindedness. They started teaching her the value of money and the importance of saving at a young age.

    RELATED: Experts Share 5 Simple Ways to Raise a Business Tycoon!

    Since she’s often included in her class’ top achievers, Juvy and Diego would reward Given monetarily. “We didn't pressure her to be on top, it was just natural for her and we wanted to give her a reward for doing a good job,” Juvy said.

    Juvy with dad Diego at G's KPop Kilig cafe.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG

    Even if it is a reward or a monetary gift from relatives, the San Miguel’s rule is to save 50%.

    “Of course, at first, she was hesitant, like, why should I save half of my money? But later on, she realized it was for her own good,” Diego, Given’s dad chimed in.

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    This habit started when Given was young and she continues to practice it now that she is old enough to receive an allowance.

    “I guess she understood the value of money. She didn’t really want to buy brand new clothes in the mall. Namamahalan siya. And since maraming ukay-ukay dito sa Baguio, that’s where she buys her clothes,” Juvy said.

    Given is a big fan of K-pop and she turned this interest into a business: a cafe and a physical store where merchandise is sold.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG

    How she got her seed money for the cafe

    Juvy also shared how Given got her initial capital for her first business. She saved all the monetary gifts Gwen received when she was a baby, all the Christmas and birthday gifts, and eventually gave it to her daughter when Given was 10 years old.

    RELATED: Nakakabilib! This Teen Started His Shoe Restoration Business With Only P300

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    Given decided to buy a bulk of ukay-ukay clothes and then sold it online. This was her first business venture at 10 years old.

    Although her income from the ukay-ukay was not yet sizable, Given moved on to another income-generating project. Since she also does graphic design, she created digital artworks and sold it online as well. She earned roughly $5 per artwork.

    G's KPop Kilig is a cafe that serves both coffee and tea drinks.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG
    Later on, Given immersed into KPop and BTS and bought different merch. “Naisip niya one day, parang sayang ang pera kasi tinititigan niya lang yung mga merch, which is quite expensive,” Juvy shared. Given then tried selling her merch and buys again, so that her money rotates.

    This gave her the idea that KPop merch is a good business and she wanted to have a physical store.

    “I was really hesitant at first. Hindi ko maisip kung seryoso ba talaga siya, kasi 12 years old pa lang siya noon eh,” Juvy shared, as she remembers how Given insisted on having a physical store of her KPop merch.

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    Customers enjoying their drinks at G's Kpop Kilig
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG

     

    But when she discerned that Given really wanted it, they computed all her earnings from graphic design and savings, and decided to go for it. G’s Kpop Kilig cafe started in 2022.

    “It wasn’t like this at first. She and her Dad were walking our streets noon, giving out flyers so the cafe can be known,” she said as she recalled their first days.

    And contrary to the negative comments they receive, Given’s capital for her business was purely from her hard work and savings, not from her parents.

    A photo wall of BTS' RM is featured in Given's cafe.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG
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    What’s the secret to raising a business-minded child?

    “Treat them like adults,” that’s Juvy and Diego’s prompt answer to the question, “What’s the secret?”

    “We didn’t really think of her being an entrepreneur at a young age. What we really wanted for her is to be independent and ready for life,” she continued.

    RELATED: How To Encourage Independence + Clear Signs Your Child Is Learning It

    Given preparing for the opening of her business.
    PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /GS KPOP KILIG
    Juvy and Diego still apply this philosophy to Given’s younger siblings, ages four and five. Here are a few of their tips for raising independent and confident children:

    • Teach independence at a young age, starting with cleaning up after their own mess.
    • Don’t be overprotective of their feelings, instead, let them feel their emotions even if it’s heartbreaking sometimes.
    • Discipline also means talking to them and explaining to them what is right and wrong.
    • Allow them to express their creative side.
    • Encourage and guide them when they make mistakes.
    • Be firm about rules.
    • Respect is two-way, avoid micro-managing kids.
    • Don’t forget to enjoy and indulge.
    • Pray every day together as a family.
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    RELATED: Japanese Kids Going On Errands Alone Inspires Pinoy Parents To Raise Independent Kids

    Juvy and Diego truly raised an independent and confident child capable of making her own decision, which turned out to be a successful venture. 

    If there’s one thing Juvy and Diego always tell Given and her younger siblings, “Do what you love while you’re young.”

    True enough, Given pours her heart out into something that she loves!

    And as the Koreans say, Fighting!'

    See more of G's Kpop Kilig here!

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