• Water Births Risky, according to Pediatricians and Ob-Gyns

    Due to lack of studies and guidelines on proper procedure, safety and benefits
  • water birth

    A report published recently in the journal Pediatrics takes a closer look at the claimed benefits of water births.

    Part of a trend which started in the 1990s, water births, where women give birth in a tub, have been said to help alleviate labor pains, as well as shorten labor. While medical experts acknowledge this, water birth has no proven benefits for both the mother and child, and even pose certain risks to the health and safety of the infant, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

    Some cases, though rare, involve the baby getting infected, drowning or having difficulty breathing because they have inhaled water, aspiration of water because it has been contaminated with blood or feces, pneumonia, or lung damage.

    Because of a lack of statistics on the safety of water births in the U.S., pediatricians urge women to only resort to water-based methods in the early stages of delivery, and to ensure that only the strictest guidelines on cleanliness are observed for the tubs and the monitoring of the entire labor process. This is because there are many factors that differentiate water births from one another—when the mother should be immersed in the water, the depth of the water or the tub, the temperature of the water, as well as the type of tub used.

    Women were also advised to treat this type of birth as a clinical trial, given the lack of studies and guidelines on its proper procedure, safety and benefits.

    "We have pretty good data to allow us to tell low-risk women that laboring in a pool or tub is safe, but there are far fewer data than there should be on the safety of delivering in water,” says Aaron Caughey, MD, PhD, professor and member of the ACOG Obstetric Practice Committee, who helped write the report.

    Sources:
    • March 20, 2014. “Water Births Not Safe Enough to Recommend, Say Pediatric Experts” time.com
    • March 20, 2014. “Water Births May be Risky, Doctors’ Groups Say” livescience.com
    • March 22, 2014. “Water Labor OK, Water Birth Risky, Groups Say” medpagetoday.com

    Photo from naturalbirthoptions.blogspot.com

    Category: Community

    Subcategory: News

    Title: Water Births Risky, according to Pediatricians and Ob-Gyns

    Lead Sentence: Due to lack of studies and guidelines on proper procedure, safety and benefits

     

     

    A report published recently in the journal Pediatrics takes a closer look at the claimed benefits of water births.

    ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

     

    Part of a trend which started in the 1990s, water births, which involve giving birth in a tub, have been said to help alleviate labor pains, as well as shorten labor. While medical experts acknowledge this, water birth has no proven benefits for both the mother and child, and even pose certain risks to the health and safety of the infant, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

     

    Some cases, though rare, involve the baby getting infected, drowning or having difficulty breathing because they have inhaled water, aspiration of water because it has been contaminated with blood or feces, pneumonia, or lung damage.

     

    Because of a lack of statistics on the safety of water births in the U.S., pediatricians urge women to only resort to water-based methods in the early stages of delivery, and to ensure that only the strictest guidelines on cleanliness are observed for the tubs and the monitoring of the entire labor process. This is because there are many factors that differentiate water births from one another—when the mother should be immersed in the water, the depth of the water or the tub, the temperature of the water, as well as the type of tub used.

     

    Women were also advised to treat this type of birth as a clinical trial, given the lack of studies and guidelines on its proper procedure, safety and benefits.

     

    "We have pretty good data to allow us to tell low-risk women that laboring in a pool or tub is safe, but there are far fewer data than there should be on the safety of delivering in water,” says Aaron Caughey, MD, PhD, professor and member of the ACOG Obstetric Practice Committee, who helped write the report.

     

     

     

    Photo from birthrootsmidwiferyllc.com

View More Stories About
View more articles