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  • Hayaan Mo Sila Maglaro! How To Bring Outdoor Play Indoors

    It will still be fun!
Hayaan Mo Sila Maglaro! How To Bring Outdoor Play Indoors
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  • With the threat of illnesses and diseases constantly looming, moms and dads understandably always put high importance on ensuring their children remain healthy and protected.

    Parents need to focus not just on providing well-balanced meals but also on encouraging their children to continue moving and playing. Physical activity, which includes exercise, play, and even doing chores, helps improve physical and mental health, and well-being, among other benefits.

    Remember, moms and dads: staying in doesn’t mean staying inactive. Say “yes” to physical activity by bringing outdoor play indoors so your kids can remain happy and active.

    1. Play traditional Pinoy games

    Ask your kids to put their gadgets down and introduce them to games you loved as a child, like piko, patintero, taguan, tumbang preso, or agawan base. Not only will they get to have fun, but they will also be able to learn skills and abilities like teamwork, agility, hand-eye coordination, and quick thinking from doing these–and the rest of the activities in this list.

    2. Build an obstacle course

    If you don’t have a yard, you can still build a fun obstacle course indoors, such as in the living room. The idea is to have different stations with different challenges, in varying degrees of difficulty. Prepare tasks like crawling through tunnels made of big appliance boxes, walking while balancing a ping pong ball on a spoon, knocking empty cans, and more.

    3. Do a scavenger hunt

    Send off your kids for a fun scavenger hunt around the house to collect hidden items. Not sure where to begin? Some creative ideas you can try include finding objects that are of a particular color or whose name starts with a specific letter. To amp up the fun, you can set a time limit and reward whoever finds the items the fastest.

    4. Hold a mini sports fest

    Spark some friendly competition by holding a good old’ sports fest. This is especially great if your family is into sports. Decide whether to do it individually or in small groups (Team Mom vs. Team Dad, girls vs. boys, or even parents vs. kids) and play classic games like basketball, discus throw using paper plates, ping-pong, and more.

    5. Conduct a painting session

    If your kids are into art, some fun can be had through a painting activity. Art helps develop children's cognitive, creative, and motor skills, so encourage them to pick up a brush, crayon, or any art materials available in the house and start painting. Some subjects they can paint include their favorite animal, or even a self-portrait.

    6. Bake their favorite treats

    Satisfy your children's craving for cookies, cakes, and other sweet treats by making them at home. Turn baking into a family activity by enlisting the kids to help out with simple tasks like measuring the ingredients, kneading the dough, and decorating the finished product. Not only will they learn baking itself, but they can also benefit from the activity as doing the steps offer opportunities that help develop motor skills and unleash creativity, among other things.

    7. Make a DIY slime

    Want to do a science project instead? Have your kids create their very own slime. Doing so not only lets them create a toy, but also allows them to learn about viscosity, chemical reactions, and other things. Here's a non-toxic slime experiment to get you started. Just make sure to supervise your kids at all times while making this!

    We may live in uncertain times, but remember that you don’t have to completely forbid your kids from doing the things they like and are right for them. Playing, being creative, making a mess, and having fun are perfectly okay even inside the home, so you can relax and just say “yes” to the things that are beneficial to your children.

    Learn more by watching this video from Breeze:

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This article was created by Summit Storylabs in partnership with Breeze.
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