• Baked Fossilized Fish

    Dress up leftover food in quirky assemblies using easy-to-find ingredients and everyday kitchen materials.

  • fossil3_CI.jpg  

    Fossilized Fish
    Do some archeological digging with this multilayered baked dish. It is a complete meal in itself, providing your family their carbohydrate, protein, and calcium needs. Here’s a tip: you don’t even have to waste your energy boiling, peeling, and squashing to make mashed potatoes—just buy them from an inexpensive fast-food restaurant near your house.

     

    What you need:
    1 cup leftover steamed fish, flaked
    4 cups mashed potatoes
    1 cup mushrooms, sliced
    1 can whole, peeled tomatoes
    1/2 small onion, chopped
    1 tbsp. garlic, chopped
    Olive oil
    Salt and pepper
    Food coloring, red and yellow
    6” springform pan (used for baking cheesecakes)
    Pastry brush

     

    Steps:
    1.In a sauce pan, sauté onions, garlic, mushrooms, and leftover fish in olive oil.

    2.Add a can of whole, peeled tomatoes, including the sauce. Cut up tomatoes with your ladle while stirring. Stir sauce until thick. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    Note: sauce has to be thick so the dish will stay firm and won’t become runny. If the sauce is still thin, add tomato paste.

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    3.Spread half of the mashed potatoes, or an inch-thick layer of it, on a six-inch springform pan. You may also use a casserole dish, but use a clear one so layers
    are visible.

    4.Pour sauce on top of mashed potatoes and cover with second layer of mashed potatoes.

    5.Use a toothpick to outline a fish-bone figure on the mashed potatoes. With a pastry brush, dab red food coloring on the fish bone etching, then yellow food coloring around it to create a fossilized effect.

    6.Bake at 120°C for 15 minutes.

    7.Cool for a bit before removing from the springform pan.

    8.Serves four to six persons.

     

    Photography by Nelson Rivera

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