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  • This Mom Was Bothered by Her Son's Filipino Textbook and Decided to Do Something About It

    The mom believes the examples in her son's textbooks were inappropriate for his age.
    by Kitty Elicay .
This Mom Was Bothered by Her Son's Filipino Textbook and Decided to Do Something About It
PHOTO BY courtesy of source
  • Since the Department of Education shifted to the K to 12 system, some of the new textbooks introduced to students have earned the ire of parents because they were filled with errors and questionable content. Sadly, books that contain inappropriate material for children are still being published and used in schools today.

    On our Facebook group Smart Parenting (SP) Village, one mom shared that she was bothered with some sentences and examples found in her son’s Filipino textbook. Her concern stemmed from the fact that her son is in kindergarten.

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    Here are some of the pages found inside the textbook

    The child is asked to copy and write the expressions on the book.
    PHOTO BY courtesy of source
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    The sentences ‘makapal ang mukha’ and 'makati ang dila' are used repeatedly on the pages as it is part of the lesson
    PHOTO BY courtesy of source
    Here's another example.
    PHOTO BY courtesy of source
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    We don't even know what this photo is trying to imply. 
    PHOTO BY courtesy of source
    We're not sure that the first example is appropriate for kindergarten students.
    PHOTO BY courtesy of source
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    The mom on our SP Village, who asked to remain anonymous, said she was bothered because the expressions sounded crass and negative. Other SP Village members pointed out the lesson was probably about ‘tayutay’ or figures of speech. However, they also said there were better, more positive words suited for kinder students.

    A child is naturally curious, and parents were concerned that after seeing this photo, children might try to do this at home.
    PHOTO BY courtesy of source
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    The photo above also shocked parents. “Nakaka-bother na ilalagay nung bata ‘yung kutsilyo sa saksaksan. Ang mga bata ngayon ay ‘naturally curious,’ baka gayahin,” one mom pointed out.

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    Mom takes action on the textbook content

    The mom told us she emailed the private school's administrators and talked to her son’s teacher about the lesson. Fortunately, the school responded quickly and was very apologetic about the incident.

    “They told me they screen the textbooks beforehand, but they also advise the teachers if a lesson is inappropriate for the students, they should skip it,” the mom shared.

    The mom, who has two kids in Kinder 2 but in different sections in the same school, said that while her daughter’s teacher skipped the lesson of the book, her son’s teacher did not do the same. “I actually considered it a blessing in disguise that [my son's] teacher did not skip the lesson and gave it as an assignment. If not, I wouldn’t have been able to see the contents of the book because the books are usually left in school,” she says.

    The mom added while teacher admitted her mistake, she said the school also advised faculty not to skip any lesson. “I got really confused and wondered whether the school was really aware of the contents of the school's books,” the mom says.

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    Our SP Village mom also emailed the Department of Education, which gave a prompt reply. Here is DepEd's statement in full:

    “Based on the review of the Department of Education’s (DepEd) Bureau of Learning Resources (BLR), the Kindergarten textbook in question, which uses 'negative expressions as samples,' is being used in private schools and did not undergo an evaluation similar to process used in public schools.

    “DepEd encourages private schools with erroneous textbooks to adopt an evaluation similar to the process of selecting textbooks used in public schools. Doing so will enable private schools to check these learning materials for accuracy and compliance with the curriculum.

    “DepEd, through its subject area specialists from the Bureau of Curriculum Development (BCD) and the Bureau of Learning Delivery (BLD), validates complaints on errors in public school textbooks. If DepEd finds these textbooks erroneous, the agency asks the development team to make the necessary revisions and issue teaching notes to the field.

    “In case of complaints received by DepEd on private school textbooks with errors, the agency forwards the said complaint to the concerned private publisher and asks them to validate/make the needed corrections.”

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    A representative of the publishing house that printed the textbooks did get in touch with the mom. “They assured me the book will be removed and pulled out from schools, and they will come up with a replacement. But since the school year is ending, they will just send revisions for now,” she shares.

    “They still assured me that the incident will not happen again, and they will be more careful in screening and proofreading items from the author before publishing. They will also do an investigation on the proofreaders who were in charge of the book,” she adds.

    If you've spotted textbooks with questionable content, report it to DepEd by emailing action@deped.gov.ph or lodge your complaint here.

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