;
embed embed2
  • Megan Fox’s 9-Year-Old Son Wears Dresses And Here’s What She Did About It

    If your daughter wants a Spiderman party or your son likes the color pink, is there cause for concern?
    by Ronna Capili Bonifacio .
Megan Fox’s 9-Year-Old Son Wears Dresses And Here’s What She Did About It
PHOTO BY INSTAGRAM /MEGANFOX
  • Megan Fox opened up to Glamour UK on her challenges as a mother, including being away from her three kids when she’s working and due to being separated from their father. 

    In a 16-minute video entitled where stars talk candidly, the Hollywood movie actress says she allows her nine-year-old son Noah to wear dresses.

    “Noah started wearing dresses when he was about two, and I bought a bunch of books that sort of addressed these things and addressed a full spectrum of what this is,” she said. 

    No space to feel weird, strange, or different

    “Some of the books are written by transgender children. Some of the books are just about how you can be a boy and wear a dress; you can express yourself through your clothing however you want. And that doesn’t even have to have anything to do with your sexuality.”

    This situation often throws many Filipino parents off, very likely because as children we were taught to understand gender through external things such as color, toys, clothes, or our choice of cartoons.

    Megan goes on to say that she’s given her children the space to be a child without being quick to label anything.

    “From the time they were very young, I incorporated those things into their daily lives so that nobody feels like they are weird or strange or different.

    RELATED: 6-Year-Old's Answer To Homework Assigning Toys Based On Gender: 'Lahat Ay Pwede'

    “I can’t control the way other people react to my children. I can’t control things that other children have been taught and then repeat to them,” she says.

    ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

    The 35-year-old mom who’s engaged to rapper Machine Gun Kelly has made it a point to keep her children off social media. “I also don’t want the world to have access to this gentle soul and say all the things that we all know they’re going to say.”

    Megan herself stays as far away from her own mobile phone as possible. Her accounts are being handled for her but she chooses what to post and writes the content.

    “I’m so proud of my kids. Noah is an unbelievable pianist. Noah can learn Mozart’s concerto in an hour and just absolutely shred on the piano,” she said.

    Help, my daughter wants a Spiderman party

    Over at Smart Parenting Village, an anonymous mom expressed concern over a simliar subject. Her four-year-old daughter asked for a Spiderman-themed birthday party and anonymous mom said “ang gusto ko sana ay Frozen dahil iniisip ko baka maka affect sa gender identity niya kapag Spiderman.”

    There was one resounding answer from our community of parents: let her be Spiderman!

    Some offered options of going for a Spidergirl costume or Spider-Gwen/Ghost-Spider, reminding anonymous mom that it’s the child’s birthday, her requests should definitely win.

    RELATED: Expert Says 'Dapat Hindi Tayo Nakikialam' When It Comes To Children's Gender Identities

    Eva Jane Lagat-Buctuan says, “What’s wrong with us parents (or adults in general) is that we’re the ones who put labels or associate colors, roles, toys or characters to gender, kesyo pink is only for girls and blue for boys, or in this case, a male cartoon charaters is only for males.

    CONTINUE READING BELOW
    Recommended Videos

    “Our kids don’t know that yet. If she wants to be Spiderman, let her be. Let’s practice being gender neutral.”

    3 things you can do to avoid gender stereotypes at home

    As adults, we push back against gender stereotypes and say parenting has no gender. Both mom and dad can work and take care of the home. But these values will not magically happen, these can be taught at a young age.

    1. Be aware of gender marketing.

    Upon entering a toy store, you may notice it’s automatically segregated into the boys’ and girls’ section. But parents say toys are just toys.

    Lady Janine Duque-Ragundiaz says, “My daughter loves cars kaysa Barbie. Nung bata ako hindi din ako mahilig sa Barbie at Mas gusto ko mag takbuhan sa labas kasama ang mga lalaki kong kapitbahay. Didn’t affect my gender at all.”

    It may be difficult to undo for parents who were raised with “girls toys” and “boys toys”, but it’s not too late to learn.

    2. Keep breeaking gender stereotypes at home.

    Alexine Parreno says, “Girls can like Spiderman just as boys can like Frozen. Not all girls like pink and not all boys like blue. 

    “This also means hindi lahat ng babae kailangan nasa bahay lang at lalaki lang ang Pwede maging breadwinner ng pamilya.

    RELATED: Please Stop Saying 'Panlalaki Yan' To My Daughter Who Loves Cars And Trucks

    "We need to break free from ‘norms’ and allow our kids to come into their own." At home parents can ask both our male and female children to learn to cook and clean up after themselves.

    ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

    As mom and dad share the responsibilities at home, children will grow up with a healthy model of a responsible adult, not “a woman’s job” and “a man’s job”. 

    3. Encourage mixed-gender play.

    The Conversation says this easily creeps up on parents and kids, when kids are asked to divide themselves into two groups (boys versus girls), or line up.

    An article entitled 5 ways parents can help kids avoid gender stereotypes says, “Parents and educators can create opportunities for kids to interact with childrens of different genders.”

    In addition, “All gender activites help children recognize their similarities and celebrate their differences and are inclusive of children who don’t identify as a girl or boy.”

    Bianca Gaddi De Vera reminds, children “should feel and know they will be accepted no matter what.” And that parents will love, support, and be there for their kids no matter what. 

    Should the time come when kids ask about their gender identity, they should know they have their parents’ support.

    What other parents are reading

  • You're almost there! Check your inbox.

    We sent a verification email. Can't find it? Check your spam, junk, and promotions folder.

Smart Parenting is now on Quento! You will love it because it personalizes news and videos based on your interests. Download the app here!

Don't Miss Out On These!
View More Stories About
Trending in Summit Network
View more articles