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Level Up Sa Laro! 5 Games For Preschoolers That Are Bit Challenging But Still Loads Of Fun
ILLUSTRATOR Stephanie Ocampo
  • When children turn three years old, they enter the early childhood stage. During this time, which is also called the preschool age, they start reaching more developmental milestones in how they learn, speak, behave, move, and play.

    Thinking up not just preschool reading activities and preschool writing activities, but also games for preschoolers can be more challenging for parents to keep their children stimulated and occupied.

    Here are recommendations by Roie Aniag Moralde, a Nursery teacher at Creative Explorers School for Children. It is a progressive school located along Visayas Avenue in Quezon City that caters to children ages 2 to 6 and practices the Developmental-Interaction Approach.

    Games for preschoolers

    "The games I decided to share below are the ones that my former students loved to play," Teacher Roie tells Smart Parenting. "Most of the materials needed are easily available for the parents at home."

    Color Scavenger Hunt

    ILLUSTRATOR Stephanie Ocampo
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    Materials

    • Colored papers or colored cartolinas
    • Objects at home

    Instructions

    1. Before playing the game, parents should line up colored papers on the floor or table. They also have an option to make the objects already accessible for children to see. Parents can also set how many objects children can find (e.g. only 5 per color).

    2. Children will roam around the room (or the entire house) and look for objects that correspond to the colored papers on the floor or table.

    3. Once they find the objects, children will put them on the correct colored papers.

    For example, a red cup on the red paper, a blue shirt on the blue paper, and a yellow crayon on the yellow paper.

    Parents have the option to let the children name each object and count them one at a time as well.

    Goals

    Through this game, children will learn to:

    • Sort objects they see at home according to color (and in extension the concept of same and different).
    • Count with one-to-one correspondence
    • Develop language skills (e.g. "This is a red cup.").

    This game can also be played when parents teach their children the sense of sight. 

    Alphabet Fishing Game

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    ILLUSTRATOR Stephanie Ocampo

    Materials

    • Do it yourself (DIY) rod, like along stick with a coin or magnet attached at one end through yarn
    • Fish cut-outs (with one letter written on each cut-out and a paper clip or magnet attached to it)

    Instructions

    1. Using a DIY rod, children will pretend to catch fish cut-outs with letters written on them.

    2. Depending on the goal, parents may mention the letter that the kids need to find (for recognition) or let them get one letter at a time and ask for the name (for identification).

    3. Parents may also teach their children how to make the sound for each letter.

    In order to make the game more fun and exciting, parents may put the fish cut-outs on a blue mat or in a small inflatable pool.

    Goals

     Through this game, children will:

    • Identify and recognize letters.
    • Make their corresponding sounds.
    • Practice eye-hand coordination.

    If the fish cut-outs are placed on a blue mat or in a small inflatable pool, it also enhances children's imagination.

    Feed The Stuffed Toy

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    ILLUSTRATOR Stephanie Ocampo

    Materials

    • Stuffed toy
    • Empty plate
    • Bowl or plate with snacks (preferably cereal or small cookies)
    • Tissue
    • Number cards (optional)

    Instructions

    1. Children will pretend to feed their stuffed toy.

    2. Parents will mention a number (or show a number card).

    3. Children will transfer the snacks to the empty plate according to the number given. For example, if parents say or show number seven, children should get seven pieces of cereal and place it on the empty plate.

    4. After that, children will pretend to feed their stuffed toy.

    Goals

    Through this game, children will:

    • Identify numbers.
    • Engage in one-to-one correspondence.
    • Practice eye-hand coordination.
    • Learn the value of sharing and caring.

    For older kids, the concept of addition and subtraction can also be taught.

    Five Senses Game (Smell And Taste Only)

    ILLUSTRATOR Stephanie Ocampo

    Materials

    • For sense of smell: 5 different scents
    • For sense of taste: 5 different food and beverages
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    Parents may put the objects inside non-transparent containers.

    Instructions

    For Sense of Smell:

    1. Children will be blindfolded by their parents.

    2. The parents will let the children smell each scent and ask to guess what it is.

    3. Once done, children will take off the blindfold and see the source of the scent for themselves.

    Parents may also ask if the kids like it or not.

    For Sense of Taste:

    1. Children will be blindfolded by their parents.

    2. The parents will let the children take a bite (or sip) of each food (or beverage) and ask to guess what it is. Kids may also mention how it tastes, if it is salty, sour, sweet, or bitter.

    3. Once done, children will take off the blindfold and see the food (or beverage) for themselves.

    Parents may also ask if the kids like it or not.

    Goals

    The best way to learn about the senses is by experience! Apart from this, through this game, children will also:

    • Develop their language skills through guessing and describing.
    • Share their preferences.
    • Compare different kinds of scents and tastes.

    DIY Indoor Obstacle Course

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    ILLUSTRATOR Stephanie Ocampo

    Materials

    • Spacious area
    • Colored tape or masking tape
    • Block toys
    • Books
    • Baskets
    • Phrase cards (optional)

    If obstacle equipment is not available, colored or masking tape, blocks, and books can be used as alternatives.

    Instructions

    1. Children will go through the obstacle course.

    2. They may jump inside and outside the shapes made out of tapes or walk on a pretend balance beam made out of blocks.

    3. If parents added number cards on each material, children can follow it, too. For example, "jump three times inside the circle."

    Goals

    Through this game, children will:

    • Develop their fine and gross motor skills.
    • Learn how to follow instructions.
    • Identify shapes and lines
    • Increase their vocabulary (e.g. jump, walk, hop, crawl, slide).
    • Practice one-to-one correspondence.

    For older children, parents may let their children read short phrases like "Hop three times" or "Jump five times."

    At the end of each of these exciting games for preschoolers, the kids won't be the only ones having fun but also their parents. Right, moms and dads?

    Read also: Preschool Activities At Home

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