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  • Mom's 7 Secrets To Potty Training Your Baby In Less Than A Week

    Keep in mind that not everything will go smoothly on the first try.
    by Kitty Elicay .
Mom's 7 Secrets To Potty Training Your Baby In Less Than A Week
PHOTO BY courtesy of Jane Alcovindas-Carriveau
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    Potty training is an important milestone for children and it’s one parents can’t help but be excited about. They look forward to the prospect of finally ditching diapers so they eagerly look for the signs that their toddler is ready.

    Potty readiness can start in children as young as 18 months and can extend up to a child’s third birthday. Keep in mind that each child hits this milestone at their own pace and not everything will go smoothly on the first try. They can learn it as quick as three days or take as long as a year to master. For mom Jane Alcovindas-Carriveau, she says her 2-year-old daughter was able to do it in less than a week ("She wakes me up at night to pee!"), but with a few hits and misses.

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    “We were so ready to give up yesterday when she ended up pooping on the couch!” Jane shares.

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    How to potty train your child in one week or less

    Jane with her husband and daughter.
    PHOTO BY courtesy of Jane Alcovindas-Carriveau

    Jane posted her experience on a mom group on Facebook and allowed SmartParenting.com.ph to share her tips so that she can help more moms who are struggling with potty training. Don’t give up yet — see if these can work for you as well.

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    1. Be a broken record.

    I constantly remind our little person, probably every five minutes. “*insert name here* pee pee, poo poo toilet, okay?” Make sure that you get a response each time.

    2. Ready the bathroom for little people.

    There should be something in the bathroom (stuffed animals, books, toy cars, etc.) to keep them busy while trying to do their business.

    3. Be with them.

    Literally, be in the bathroom with them. Pretend to poop or pee if necessary, so you can do things together.

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    4. Demonstrate.

    When you need to go, ask your child to come with you so she can get acquainted with the idea of going to the toilet.

    5. Rewards and consequences.

    We made a chart where she can place her stickers to keep track of her "achievements." We also use the stickers ourselves when we pee or poop, so she gets the idea.

    When she pees or poops in other places, she doesn't get a sticker. When she pees or poops elsewhere, but was able to make it to the toilet before she 'ends' her journey, sticker is dependent on how bad the mess was. 

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    We also gave her the stern voice and mean look when she pooped on the couch. She was so scared that she stayed in the bathroom waaaay after she's done pooping.

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    One of Jane's tips is to put stuffed animals, books, toy cars, and more in the bathroom to keep kids busy while trying to do their business.
    PHOTO BY courtesy of Jane Alcovindas-Carriveau
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    6. Be overacting, but genuine.

    When she's successful with her toilet business, we are loud in congratulating her. But I think what gets her the most is when I am genuinely happy and give her hugs and kisses; you can see a sense of pride in her eyes. 

    Today, Daddy was still sleeping when she pooped. So she said, "Show Daddy (the poop)!" because she was so proud.

    7. It's not only them, it's you, too.

    Your child's signs of readiness to potty train are just as important as yours. It takes a lot of patience, so, ask yourself, "Are you ready?" before diving into the messy journey.

    Potty trained kids can still wet the bed when they're asleep. Click here for some tips to prevent that from happening.

     

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